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Vizio TV Reviews

by , Senior Editor

 

Vizio M651d Review

The 65 inch size class is a very competitive one in the realm of LED TVs. The Vizio M651d does a good job of balancing value with some hard hitting features that make it hard not to give this one a second look. It sells for $500 dollars less than the massive 70 inch M series TV above it, bringing it to the less than $2000 range. Read More...


Vizio VF552XVT Review

The new VF552XVT from Vizio has the latest and greatest features that the company hopes will keep Vizio competing with the Tier 1 manufacturers. This series has LED local dimming backlighting, a 240Hz refresh rate (listed as 480Hz but that is back light manipulated spec), and a new black drive system. This is the second tier feature and price offering from Vizio for 2010/2011, the XVT Pro series Vizios are the step up from the XVT series. Read More...


Vizio XVT472SV Review

Overall testing of the XVT472SV processors was very positive. Blurred edges were apparent in many of the test objects and this problem carried through to video content as well. We were most impressed with the HD Stadium seating test for which this TV registered the best result we have ever seen. There was no moire' pattern in the seating and panning side to side was extremely smooth. Read More...


Vizio VF550XVT Overview

This LCD TV features the controversial 120Hz processing that Vizio calls Smooth Motion. As we've noted with other TVs with 120Hz processing it's best not to use this feature when viewing film based content. Vizio lists dynamic contrast ratio at 50,000:1. It does not give a figure for native contrast ratio so this is sure to be a weakness of the TV since some manufacturers list dynamic contrast at 1M:1. Vizio has increased processing response time to 5ms with a 10-bit data input-panel. We'll see how that response time measures in a true test of motion lag. This unit will not be available until January 2009 at a price of around $2000. One of the biggest questions we have is whether the TV has an anti glare screen and if so how much it decreases contrast and black levels – especially at angles. Read the complete VF550XBT over and see it's specifications

Vizio VW42LF Review

Vizio founder and CEO William Wang has done a fantastic job of gaining market acceptance in the U.S. discount retail market. Models such as the VW42LF are selling at brisk pace at some of the nations largest retailers. Vizio is now the number 3 seller of LCD TVs in the U.S. behind Sony and Samsung. The VW42LF is a new 3rd generation 42" LCD 2008 model with some improved features over previous models. Read the full VW42LF Review

Vizio VW37L Review

We used the outstanding new high def release of The Fifth Element for our testing in High Definition resolutions. Edges were clean post calibration and I felt the TV had a clear presentation with HD content. However, the LCD has a greenish/yellow caste that is ever-present and affects skin tones negatively. Response rate time appeared to be an area of concern with fast moving scenes during the film taking on a jerky appearance. Read the full VW37L Review

Vizio vs. Olevia LCD Shootout (Vizio VW46LF)

Wow! What an interesting experience testing these two upstarts side by side. There are phenomenal quality differences in numerous areas between the Olevia and Vizio LCDs. The contrasts could not be more defined. There are several concern areas to look out for in each unit as well. And there are positive attributes in each LCD. Both LCDs are 1080p and both entered the market in the U.S. and Canada in early 2008. The Olevia is made in Taiwan and the Vizio LCD is manufactured in China according to the company. Olevia established a name for its product a couple of years ago by offering quality LCDs at lower prices than Sony and Samsung. Read the full Vizio vs Olevia Review

Vizio P42HD Plasma TV Review

Picture quality on the Vizio 42" HDTV plasma was passable for low-cost a plasma TV under casual observation. Unfortunately for consumers, during challenging scenes and during advanced testing we noted serious flaws with the low-cost TV's picture. During testing with Joe Kane Production's Video Essentials we observed significantly more nuance in the center portion of the grayscale image test than at the image's edges. The test's indication that darks would fall straight to black and light matter would jump to white was confirmed when we tested the TV watching After the Sunset with our DVD player. Read the full P42HD Review



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